A Homicide Detective Who Kills

by Ryu

…an arson investigater who sets fires.

…an FBI agent who works for the mob.

…a border patrol agent working for the cartels.

…a prison guard helping inmates escape.

They all exist. If one looks hard enough, one can find them. Their accounts are invaluable.

The police knowledge of human nature is good, but has a blind spot: they do not apply the same ideas to fellow officers. This is of course wrong. Cops lie, they beat their wives, they drink, they make threats, they speed their cars. Cops are normal people who happen to wear a uniform.

What the public sees and what is real are two different things. In every profession, there’s a customer to be served; in policework, the public is that customer. Cops act differently around other cops than around outsiders.

One would think that a homicide detective as a killer would work out great. This is not so. They are always accustomed to working under state protection. They don’t “feel” the entire risk. Being an insider tends to make one careless. Instead of covering all the angles, which takes work, the tendancy is to just cook reports, which is easy.

There were two detectives who killed for the mob: Lou Eppolito and Steve Caracappa. Both were NYPD detectives, first grade.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Eppolito_and_Stephen_Caracappa

Coincidentally, this is also how it works in the third world; cops working for criminals. It is quite natural that as the USA slips in status, that it should take on the same characteristics.

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